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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 929 (some duplicates have been removed)
, this is "democracy now!" >> in egypt, the united states followed standard operating procedure. standard procedure when one of your favorite dictators gets into trouble. first, the support him as long as possible. but if it becomes really impossible, say the army turns against him, then you send him out to pasture and get the intellectual quest to issue declarations about your love of democracy, then try to restore the bill system as much as possible. >> "who owns the world?" with the presidential election less than two away, we turn to a major new address by noam chomsky on pressing topics not addressed in the president to campaign -- climate change, latin america's break with the united states, the arab spring, and the danger nuclear-weapons already pose in the middle east. >> israel refuses to allow inspections at all, refuses to join the non-proliferation treaty, has hundreds of nuclear weapons, advanced delivery system, and a long record of violence and repression. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are
is running for the united states senate. you know very well by plan is my own. i have sought the expert opinions of those outside to get the brightest and the best and every word of that plan has been cited either in the online plan or in print. when you got into this race as the democrats at the thought -- as a democrat and you thought is going to be a coronation and now you are in a serious race with a serious woman. >> we're going to move on to the next question. >> in this tide of rising national debt, i was wondering about congressional earmarked. do you support elimination of them? here is one -- $1.9 million for a water taxi to pleasure beach in bridgeport. >> first call me respond to this last allegation. there is no doubt we'll look at her jobs plan, there are entire paragraphs and sentences lifted from the house republican website, from the cato institute. i don't know what you call it, but all i am saying is this is not a plan rooted in what best for the state of connecticut. this is a plan written by people in washington. when that mcmahon's idea that by simply giving a bunc
in an interview the united states both economically and militarily and also in terms of its overall influence, really is as strong as it's ever been. he said this on february 21st, 2012 in case you want to pinpoint at least that statement. tom, do you agree with the assertion that right now or in 2012 the united states is as strong as it's ever been? >> that depends, david come if you were speaking about strong, relative in to houma? and in what area. i think there is no question in terms of influence. and on the global stage where the country that is most emulated in the world. but it is possible as mohammed said the world's cleanest dirty shirt also. and so come on a really prefer to think about american strength and i have to answer this question in a little bit of detail in terms of what are the things that have made us strong to start with? and i would argue that we had a formula for success in this country and was built on five pillars. one was educate our people love to and beyond what the technology was so we could get the most out of it. so it was universal primary education, the fac
the united states. >> campbell is scheduled to meet with japanese officials to discuss bilateral cooperation on situations in east asia. >>> we interviewed a prominent british analyst on how he sees japan/china relations at the moment. professor michael clarke is director general at the royal united services institute for defense and security studies. >> for european, we understand the issue, i think, of the islands. we understand the delicacy of the issue. but it is a problem that can be similar disputes all around the world, and they will flare up from time to time. the most important thing from tokyo's point of view is not to allow too many precedents to be set on either side, which lock both powers, both beijing and tokyo, into positions from which they cannot retreat. we are modern powers in the world. there are many powers in the world which really are not modern. china is a great 20th century power. it's not really a 21st century power. and so those of us who are post-modern century societies, who live in very 21st century ways in the world, have got to share our ideas about the legit
. is in the interest of the united states to solve this and get a two-state solution to this? various members of this current administration have said so, and if that's true it would be good to succeed. there are others who are not so sure that it's achievable of that political capital is worth spending on a. that's an important question, important decision for the next administration is the next president wants to do this, he's going to have to build a domestic constituency to overcome opposition. on the question of the iran syria hezbollah act, the administration will have decisions to make about sanctions, about diplomacy, about war. if the iranian regime comes to the table with serious intent, for any reason, either because sanctions are fighting so hard or because they are threats of military strike, or for any other reason, my question as an individual is with the american government take yes for an answer, or will the american government have conditions that are, cannot be met by the other side? and with the administration even consider what was previously called grand bargain, which w
in order for us to invest in the united states and create jobs. >> we've got some good role models even though this roundtable -- business roundtable doesn't get involved and we don't even great legislators. my expense as a governor is a competitive state, our best teachers on political activist with the labor unions, and then later on george soros. he taught every wealthy individual american you can't afford to sit on the sidelines. and so i say go for it. >> we don't do endorsements either. we have a pack. we're very involved, and last week we launch a retail meets the vote campaign and will probably connect wit with a quar of a million retailers and millions of their employees. not endorsing, not to do that would give them voter guide, encouraging them to be in full. if we're going to address any of the issues, maybe we can get something done everything looks exactly the same. but there's a sense of people of a better understanding of our positions there's a greater likelihood we will get some action on them and that's why we've engaged our membership. >> let's go to questions from t
women. >> you bet. >> don't write over mitt. >> don't write over the next president of the united states. my oldest son. he just graduated. >> give them hell today. >> thanks for coming. we have a lot to be excited about today. we are here on a corner -- [inaudible] i know there are a lot of small business representatives and employees here today. for your efforts and hard work, give them a hand. [applause] president calvin coolage once remarked that the business of america is business. his words are as true today as they were when he said them nearly 100 years ago. small business drives our economy, fuels or communities and feeds our families. [applause] small businesses like ours represent 97.8% of all employers. we employ half of america's work force and create between 60 respect -- 60% and 80% of job growth in the country. we know how very important those jobs numbers are. i imagine you feel like i do. i need my job, and so do our employees. thankfully here at ball we have secure jobs. you will see trucks coming and going from a long hard day any minute now. i can't imagine the stres
-american to attend university explains why race remains a crucial issue in the united states. >> south korean pop star has a u.k. number one. if you haven't heard it, hear this. >> the ridiculously catchy tune with its overtop video has become a global phenomenon. ♪ >> the song, what exactly is gangham style? >> it doesn't have any meaning actually. i'm just saying gangham style which doesn't have that much meaning. it's about some lady and some guys, you know -- >> the video has been viewed on youtube more than 300 million times. has more likes than any other in history. and despite being a self-parody has been affectionately spoofed by the thai navy, a gruche californian lifeguards. -- group of californian lifeguards and even prisoners in a jail. it's the latest in a long line of viral chart hits. remember this one? >> ♪ >> and what about the crazy frogs? but this is one has been more successful worldwide. when you play the song on the radio, people seem to quite like the song because it's catchy. normally with a novelty song like this people hate the song but quite like the video. this wor
to the president of the united states during the debate? it was deeply disrespectful. tonight, the over the line attacks on this president. >>> and stop the freakout. bill campaigns for the president as new poll numbers in key states bring good news. team obama and look who's stumping today. >>> plus, mitt romney is running away from views on women's issues that he held way, way back earlier this year. today he canceled his appearance on the view and sent his wife instead. just wait until you hear how she deen fended his record on women's rights to choose. they actually think this is going to work? okay. you're watching "politicsnation" on msnbc. ♪ i look at her, and i just want to give her everything. yeah, you -- you know, everything can cost upwards of...[ whistles ] i did not want to think about that. relax, relax, relax. look at me, look at me. three words, dad -- e-trade financial consultants. so i can just go talk to 'em? just walk right in and talk to 'em. dude, those guys are pros. they'll hook you up with a solid plan. they'll -- wa-- wa-- wait a minute. bobby? bobby! what are you do
at that point, bun of the biggest banks in the united states. things vice president changed. not in major terms of the bank. should be working for the bank as a whole. for the customer they shouldn't be seeking big rewards in themselves. contrast that to what goes on themselves. tremendous part of the conversation not just in bonuses. compared to what they would have been 20 or 25 years ago. no what kind of climate does that create? they get to elaborate a little bit. people who criticize this rule, they are sure to speculative access. infact, a lot of things are at the heart of the banking crisis. why did that go wild? i would argue that the kpep sags practices crept in into trading parts of the bank. so the lending offices said, how can hay make a lot of money and get a big bonus? over simplifying a little bit. it's true. the chairman of the citi bank. the biggest bank. a couple of trillion dollar banks. he said to me, we put these two different kinds of organizations together and it different work. and it's a cultural problem. you didn't just regular rate the losses. it created a tension in
for president of the united states. >> today in a "democracy now!" special, we look at the life and legacy of senator george mcgovern, best known for running against president richard nixon and an anti-4 platform. >> as one whose heart has eight for the past 10 years of the agony of vietnam, i will hold the senseless bombing on and our role day. >> as a family spokesperson confirms senator mcgovern is in hospice care, unresponsive and there in the end of his life, we will play extended excerpts of the documentary "one bright shining moment: the forgotten summer of george mcgovern." it traces his historic campaigne presidency. >> that is the highlight of my life, i guess, winning the democratic nomination of the oldest political party in american history. i remember excited faces, people laughing and talking, some weeping. there was a lot of emotion and passion in that campaign. and i will take those memories with me the rest of my life. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we're on the road in sacramento,
's been very clear. the president of the united states owes the american people candor and transparency on what's happened. that clearly has been a test which has been failed. they started talking about the spontaneous eruption that was incredible on 9/11, and this is a video that's been around for months. second, we have the type of equipment used. third, we now know there were intelligence reports. fourth, wern the ambassador was concerned about the security, and fifth, we had a stonewalling for days and days with this very story. >> that's the key point with ambassador rice making the runs. larry, do you agree with rich williamson, larry, that, in fact, president obama owes the american people a clear, transparent explanation? >> i think he has given it. you have to remember everything rich said is contradicted by the director of national intelligence, general clapper, who was first appointed to the pentagon by the bush administration. he came out and he said, i gave them this information, and it was wrong. when we found out, i changed the narrative, and more important, obama's going
, reporting on the largest manhunt in modern california history. booktv visits the united states naval academy. politics, history, and war will be covered. visit booktv.org for a complete schedule of this week's programming and watch as all become weekend long on c-span2 and a booktv.org. up next, dakota meyer talks about the battle in afghanistan and his efforts to rescue soldiers that were ambushed by taliban forces. dakota meyer became the first living marine to receive the medal of honor since the vietnam war. this is about 45 minutes. >> i would like to welcome everybody. this is my official welcome. we are honored to have you here today. we are part of an elite club of authors. there are many that are active here in the american legion post the other thing i want to mention is each of you have a card that looks something like this. several years ago, we began a program called support the troops. the weather was books or dvds or even ipods, batteries, some of the things that they let us know that they needed, and we collected a few boxes and sent them to the troops. each year it has gotte
powder with the maritime powers, like brittany is to be our today, the united states. and then, there is an american and he put these two ideas together. and where the two great powers, the land power and d.c. power come together, he called the shout about. and the middle east is located in one of the world's great shutterbugs. the interesting thing is about them is that small states have the ability to shift the power from one large side to the other, simply because it depends on which side they're on or which side they decide to shift two. in the middle east, the old part with syria and is today. but, after the fall of the soviet union, after the end of the cold war, there was another heart. since the entire east were taking place at that time, when the circulation state joined the middle east, when afghanistan pushed the edge of the middle east. and so today, we have a second part inside the middle east and that is iran. and those two cards, with their particular allies are causing this growing second global cold war. now the first indication we have is that is the reincarna
personal connection. we'll explain. >>> and the most affordable cities to live in the united states. is yours one of them? >>> good morning. i'm lynn berry. after the third debate between president obama and republican nominee mitt romney, there are just 14 days left before american voters choose their next president. according to a cbs news instant polls on uncommitted voters, president obama was a clear 2-1 victor with 53% saying he won. governor romney got 23%. 24% called it a tie. a cnn orc international poll called the debate closer, with 48% saying obama won while 40% picked obama. for more we go to nbc's steve handlesman who's in florida for us. steve, good morning. >> reporter: hi, lynn. thanks. good morning from boca raton, florida. the debate here last night was clearly the most combative so far. though surprising to some, not on the issue of libya. mitt romney was able to make his larger point, his claim that america is weaker now overseas than it was four years ago. mitt romney and barack obama came to their third and final debate tied in national polls, but their tv aud
the united states government or any other organization i'm a part of, and therefore, now, i can be a troublemaker. i'm focusing on the countries of egypt, libya, and tunisia, and focus more on egypt because i spent 20 years on the country, lived there for six years, and there for six weeks during the summer time. algeria and morocco have been peaceful, but don't count on it. algeria and libya or net oil exporters to help them get on their feet if they do not focus too much on that. as the ambassador said, libya's back to 1.4 million barrels a day, almost miraculous given the countries that have gone through things like this. algeria produces about the same amount of oil as libya, but it has six times the people so there's a lot more people to spread that across. algeria produces 2.3 cubic feet of gas a year, and if you do the math, it's a billion cubic feet per person in both countries, and if distributed nicely, everyone would be well-off, but we all know that's not the way it is. egypt is a net oil importer. it is a gas exporter, but right now, mostly lng because the pipelines
day to vote in the presidential race there. chavez has denounced the united states as "the biggest menace to our planet." he once called former president george w. bush "a donkey, a coward and an immoral person." anchor jorge ramos from our partner network univision is in venezuela tonight for the election, and i spoke with jorge just moments ago here. jorge, great to have you with us again tonight and president chavez finding himself in his closest race yet to hold on to power. >> reporter: absolutely. for the first time in 13 years president hugo chavez might lose the presidency. he hasn't been able to control inflation, crime, corruption, and for the first time all the opposition parties got together behind one candidate, henrique capriles, a formidable 40-year-old former governor. >> we al know that president chavez almost made it political sport to become friends with our own rivals in america but he also controls a significant amount of oil that comes to the united states. >> reporter: there is a lot at stake for the united states here in venezuela. on a personal level, we ha
worldwide of the united states military? two minutes, virgil goode. >> as i said, if i'm elected president i will balance the budget, and part of the cuts have to be in the department of defense. we cannot do as mitt romney and paul ryan suggest increase military funding by $2 trillion over the next decade. i support a strong defense. but we need to retrench rather than trying to be the policemen of the world. we have too many soldiers, too many troopers scattered around the world. our presence needs to be decreased around the world, not increased, and the united states should stop trying to be the overseer of the world. that will save us billions and billions of dollars. [applause] >> all right. governor johnson. >> we need to provide ourselves with a strong national defense. the operative word here is defense, not offense and not nation building. [applause] >> the biggest threat to our national security is the fact that we're bankrupt, that we're borrowing and printing money to the tune of 43 cents out of every dollar we spend. in promising to submit a balanced budget to congress in the ye
, that's what t big banks do. nobody else in the united states or in the uk is equally committed to making it medium sized. eat before the crisis or during the crisis. the importance to protect people with their money and give them a safe place to put it. those are all public functions. they're all protected every place. when push comes to shove, they get double. you shouldn't do that when people are just engaged in trading for their own account. without any public responsibilities as i see it. that's the heart of the matter. >> i'm very pleased you would come in at this ime. i think we suffer from a major confusion that you can help us sort out. in the u.s. they're returning following the advice. and we have in the independent banking commission a halfway house. and it should go the whole way. this is a completely wrong characterization that i think of what you're saying, you're saying they can't a wide rapg of functions that can be alongside the payment system. then there are another type of transactions that shouldn't be there at all. they should go off right to a separate ins
comprise not haphazardly but purposefully a history of the united states for the last 200 or so years. a number of these books have been best sellers. traitor to his class and the first american were both finalists for the pulitzer prize and you can see h. w. brands on tv all the time if you go to the history channel or turn on the tv, there he is. this book is -- i will hold this up again so you can see and recognize it easily at the book signing tend, it is a tremendous biography of ulysses grant filled with stuffed i certainly never knew and was delighted to find out. it is very authoritatively and readable. before we get to grant himself i wanted to ask bill a broad question about biography. here at the book festival there are a number of biographers. i have read several of these already, robert caro's latest volume in his massive history, biography of lyndon johnson. janet reed's biography leonard cohen, all these people at the book festival among others. david maraniss is here with a book about obama. i was curious because all these books are so different in terms of authors's a
poverty which is one-fifth of what the united states does. and they have that rate because they have serious social welfare state, a serious social welfare network. and before we talk about moving more away from that and more towards giving a greater role to the market in our society, we need too seriously address what is clearly one, not the only, but one very important component of why finland outperforms the united states on educational measures. >> so, i will say when i came back from a trip to finland people want to have school in evanston, they should probably move to finland because it is quite a different social contact that they have created there. so i don't actually, we speak in the education debate, i was not making it, to make clear, i think in general society, this is a huge problem and how think about this and talk about it. but within education i think there's great deal of attention to poverty. they are serve has been this morning. i think on all sides, dislike debate is a lot more common ground about poverty than you would know from the rhetoric. >> quick last word
of the united states, alan, i would order the secretary of the treasury to immediately buy up the bad home loan mortgages in america and renegotiate at the new value of those homes, at the diminished value of those homes and let people be able to make those payments and stay in their homes. is it expensive? yes. but we all know, my friends, until we stabilize home values in america, we're never going to start turning around and creating jobs and fixing our economy. and we've got to give some trust and confidence back to america. i know how the do that, my friends. and it's my proposal. it's not senator obama's proposal, it's not president bush's proposal. but i know how to get america working again, restore our economy and take care of working americans. thank you. >> senator, we have one minute for a discussion here. obviously, the powers of the treasury secretary have been greatly expanded. the most powerful officer in the cabinet now. hank paulson says he won't stay on. who do you have in mind to appoint to that very important post? senator mccain? >> not you, tom. >> no, with good reason. >
basis. pretty much every day, i will look at scotus blog, supreme court of the united states. or there is a blog called "how appealing." there are a variety of blogs, written by law professors. some are more conservative and some are more liberal. i will look at those every once in awhile and see what people are saying and thinking and writing about legal issues. i find them interesting and occasionally useful. you know. it is the world i come from, as you know. i am not going to say, i am never going to read the law review article again. >> do you read them before, as you are trying to sort through cases? >> usually only when the briefs point them out. i rarely do an independent search. >> you talked about the role of clerks in sorting through the cert petitions. in recent years, the court has taken many fewer cases than it did in an earlier area. -- earlier era. maybe there are fewer circuits and fewer important issues, but that seems unlikely. do you have a sense of whether the court is taking the right number? >> the truth is, i do not know if it is unlikely, for this rea
is inconceivable that the president of the united states was unaware of the facts that were obvious to the intelligence community. how could he have not known and if he didn't know, who kept that information from him? >> governor, that is the duty of inquiry. you ran a government. you understand and i think particularly where there is notice and now you should be getting real time that -- that give accurate and actual information. this is the same paradigm we are seeing i fast and furious e the response is well, we didn't know anything about it. and you can't be able to be held unaccountable because you choose not to listen to those who have information to bring to you. and i'm being kind when i say choose not to listen. i think there is a duty of inquire arery. there is a duty of responsibility when something that significant that had to be one of the most important things the federal government was is responding to at that moment and for them to say that they aren't aware of the circumstances suggests one of two things. either incompetentence or are misrepresentation. >> mike: i
information out of him as to possible other al-qaeda operatives here in the united states. but i have no reason to believe he is night lone wolf other than the fact that during the course of the investigation, he did talk about having contacts back in bangladesh and in yemen all i believe. >> he faces charges of attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction and attempting to provide material support to al-qaeda. he was order held without bond and did not enter a plea. new york city police commissioner ray kelly says this is the 15th plot since september 11th to commit a terrorist act in new york city. each one so far thwarted by law enforcement agencies working together. >> thank you. >>> to politics now. president obama and republican nominee mitt romney will be back on stage together again tonight but this time, it's okay for them have a little fun. >> they are he keynote speakers it alfred e smith fundraiser. during election years, it often gives presidential candidates the chance to take some lighthearted jabs at each other. romney, let's get back to what he was up to. he was in
comparable to iran in terms of views of the united states. so there's a very different dynamic on the world vis-a-vis western intervention, vis-a-vis islamism notwithstanding what we're seeing in the news. and i that thought the uprising in benghazi was hugely important to think about when 30,000 people rose up a couple of weekends ago to throw out islamist militias. the population once again taking control of a situation where a dysfunctional government wasn't able to. and i found the intervention very interesting because in many ways i think the main bogeyman was the fear of what the 30,000 would do if things got much worse, which brings up another thing that i should have said in the introductory remarks, that the arab spring -- the dynamic we view it is people against regimes, but just as important in the arab spring is regimes against regimes and people against people, and i'm happy to talk about those dynamics in the q&a, but it's not just people against regimes. following benghazi, a well known libyan academic said something which stuck with me, he said libyans have no idea where the
of the united states, and the hurricane-force wind gusts will begin moving onshore during the day tomorrow, last through tomorrow night, and probably into tuesday morning as well. you can just see how massive this storm actually is going to be. and that's why we're so worriedly about the storm surge danger. if you're being asked to evacuate, you definitely need to. this is going to bring a tremendous amount of water near and just north of wherever the storm eventually makes landfall. and be-ause up the coast, we could see heavy rains parts of the area, a lot of maryland under a flood watch now as well, 5-10 inches of rain locally could fall in some spots. we have all the ingredients of a terrible storm, bob, coastal flooding, inland nothing. power outages are going to be a huge problem and in the mountains we could be talking about a lot of snow. >> schieffer: thank you very much, dave. and now to cbs news national correspondent chip reid who is in ocean city, maryland. chip, is it there yet? >> reporter: well, not quite the full force of it yet, bob, but we are certainly feeling stronger winds,
attack in the united states last year. talk about credibility. when this administration says all options are on the table, they send all these mixed signals. in order to solve this peacefully, you have to have the ayatollahs change their minds. look at where they are. it is because this administration has no credibility on this issue. this administration watered down sanctions. now we have been in place because of congress. the military option is not being viewed as credible. make sure we have credibility. under a romney administration, we will have credibility. >> incredible. do you think there is any possibility the entire world would have joined us? russia and china? these are the most crippling sanctions in the history of sanctions. period. when the governor is asked about it, he said, we have to keep the sanctions. you're going to go to war? the interesting thing, how are they going to prevent war? saye is nothing more they'd we should do than what we have already done. with regard to the ability of the united states to take action militarily, it is not in my purview to talk about c
, particularly in the united states where we think there are some messages that are not sufficiently understood. and that's what, i hope, you will be hearing throughout the day today. and the messages at this event are focused on four issues; u.s. competitiveness, the future of jobs, economic growth -- which is tied, of course, to the first two -- and then the revival of our cities with detroit as case study number one. we are very proud to be in detroit because we see it as a great city that has incredible potential that we would just love to help participate in that dialogue to help move that process forward a little faster. but what we really want to do is change the dialogue about how the world thinks about technology. because we really don't think it is understood or appreciated how rapidly the entire landscape is shifting because of tech. i mean, today apple's literally announcing the next iphone. that's cool, but that's just the most obvious example of things that continue to move at astonishing speed, and there's developments literally everywhere you look. and we don't think leaders gen
between china and the united states would be a disaster for both countries. and it would be in possible to describe what a victory would look like. and it requires, on both sides, patience and understanding above all, that they are trying to reach in each country domestic pressures that emphasize disagreements that might arise. we see that in our political campaign in which both campaigns are using language about china, which i think is extremely deplorable. and you see it in the chinese literature, from their strategic channels come in which their strategic analysts are pushing a very nationalistic line. and, indeed, as tradition of time is ideology diminishes, it is the prospect that nationalism becomes a substitute. many of the issues that arise, of a past, need to overcome a so-called dotted line and the south china sea that was done by south chinese emperor who had never heard of law of the seas because that concept didn't exist many years ago. so the issue of the islands, and there are hundreds of islands, requires in my view first of all separating the notion of freedom of the se
. >> the romneys had left the united states and went to mexico to avoid persecution, but it's also to pursue polygamy. >> narrator: miles romney had five wives and 30 children. >> they built a ranch and he's back in stone age conditions with no money. romney's father is now on the scene. that gets destroyed by guerrillas. they move back to california, poverty again. they build it back up. they move back to salt lake city. they build it back up. romney's whole history of a family is that they knocked us down, we built it back up. we didn't make a fortune; we made a bunch of fortunes. and they resented us for our success, but we kept coming back. that's romney's history. >> with someone with a name with romney you heard about the sufferings of your ancestors and their sacrifices and all they've done that you feel like, well, it's my turn now; i've got to pick up the baton and run with it. >> narrator: but mitt and his family rarely tell the story to outsiders. >> it's an incredible history. he can't talk about it because it involves polygamy. and so if the core of your personality is something
. the united states has the worst rate of industrialized nations of women dying in connection with pregnancy and childbirth. under obama care there will be 30 million people without essential health care by the year 2022. and during the bush and the obama years our constitution has been shredded while the impeerl presidency -- the imperial presidency expanded. the presidents that think they can take us to war on a pack of lies. with presidents that think federal government should have the authority to round anyone up, including u.s. citizens, and imprison them without charges, without trial, without legal representation, and without the right ofwe do '. habeous corpus. and our elected officials are sound asleep when the pentagon is warning that climate change is a greater long-term security risk to the united states than terrorism. so if you like the way things are going, vote democratic or republican. if you want real change, vote your conscience, vote justice. economic justice, social justice, environmental justice. [cheers and applause] >> back to our opening statement from virgil goode.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 929 (some duplicates have been removed)